con-sara-cy theories

Episode 17: T.W.E.P. Programs - Fact or Fiction?

May 15, 2024 Episode 17
Episode 17: T.W.E.P. Programs - Fact or Fiction?
con-sara-cy theories
Show Notes Transcript

Transcription by Otter.ai.  Please forgive the typos!

Welcome to con-sara-cy theories. Are you ready to ask questions you shouldn't and find information you're not supposed to know? Well, you're in the right place. Here is your host, Sara Causey.

 

Hello. Hello, and thanks for tuning in. In tonight's episode, I'm going to talk about TWEP programs - terminate with extreme prejudice. Are these programs real? Are they theoretical? Have they ever actually been used on anyone? Are they just imaginary? Perhaps somebody has been reading too many spy novels watching too many James Bond movies getting a little too obsessed with the Q branch gadgets. Are these 12 programs real? Are they fact or are they fiction? I have my beverage ready to go. I've got a mug of hot tea here with me because my voice has been a little bit hinky today. And so it goes, I finally have time to sit down to get my research materials gathered around me to sit down and record an episode. And that's when my allergies and my voice are like, Ah, no, no, we're gonna retaliate. So we'll see how it goes. Pour yourself up a beverage of choice and we will saddle up and take this ride. This is the kind of episode where I really wish that I could put a finger of bourbon in this mug of tea and have a modified hot toddy because hot cha cha this is a topic. It's deep, it's dark. It might be upsetting for some people, because frankly, it's an upsetting McCobb and morbid subject matter. With that being said, I feel like we have a right to know if these weapons exist. And they have in fact been used on people which I believe in the course of this episode, you'll conclude that this is real, and that these weapons have been used on people and there's proof of it. You might not sleep so well at night. This is totally the victor Ziegler moment in the library slash billiard room where he's telling Dr. Bill about you wouldn't sleep so well at night. If you really knew who was in that room, you really knew the things that went on at those parties. You wouldn't sleep so well at night. And so it may be with this episode. I got onto this topic by accident. I was watching a video where the author Mark Shaw was talking about his research into Dorothy Kilgallen and YouTube and all of its algorithmic glory suggested that I watch a video about Richard Meltzer. And I thought, Richard Belzer, the comedian, the TV actor, like why the hell would I want to do that? Well, apparently, he wrote a book called hit list, and I never knew it, but he too gets into the JFK pop pop and the various theories around the Pop Pop, as well as convenient deaths. People who witnessed something people who had a story to tell that just suddenly don't exist on this planet anymore. Now, I have not read hitlist in its entirety. I have checked it out, but I have not yet read it in its entirety. I'm sure that will be an episode all its own to talk about his research, what he has to say, is it credible, is it not? But in the introduction of hitlist, he starts talking about these 12 programs, and just how dark and sinister they are. So he has this heading about whether or not the United States intelligence community had the capability to make pop pops appear to be from natural causes, ie heart attacks or cancer. And then he goes on to say regarding the feasibility of medical pop pops, it is quite shocking. And he goes on to list heart attacks and cancer in particular, as something that the Charlie India Alpha has had the capability of doing for many years, and that it's now considered very concrete technology in the world of the professional pop popper. So not only is it possible, but it's a technology that these intelligence and spy organizations have had for years. And he writes it may sound like a James Bond movie but Charlie India Alpha technicians have actually testified to Congress about twip terminate with extreme prejudice weapons. Many of these twip weapons were the result of the Charlie India alphas active pursuit of finding ways to kill people that would not look like murder, and it would leave no post mortem residue. One memo that he quote says, I think the gross divisions in presenting the subject might be number one, bodies left with no hope of the cause of death being determined by the most complete autopsy and chemical examinations. Number two bodies left in such circumstances as to simulate accidental death. Mm hmm. Haven't we seen some of those recently? Jeffrey Epstein number three bodies left in such circumstances as to simulate suicidal death Oh for sure. Jeffrey Epstein there number four bodies left with residue that simulate those by unnatural death. And there you have it, folks your tax dollars at work killing people without a trial and at a crime scene near you and quote, and as He further says, it won't even look like any funny business was involved. Somebody off to themselves. It wasn't an accident. It was an act of God. Oh, well, we can't blame anybody because they had a heart attack. We can't blame anybody because they got cancer. It was just a shit happens kind of thing. Beltre goes on to talk about Senator Frank Church, and the church hearings and the mayor do well, things that he tried to bring to light in those hearings and really sort of suffered for his desire to see the truth come out. He goes on to mention how to have JFK is allegedly longterm mistresses. Florence Pritchett and Mary Pinchot Meyer both died within two years of his death. And it said that Florence Pritchett died of cancer. Also, don't forget that Jack Ruby died of cancer. Now Mary Pinchot Meyer was murdered in the park in some really weird circumstances that most certainly could be its own separate episode.

 

But as Beltre writes, How can you not get suspicious about cancer deaths? Like, isn't it just a little bit too convenient? And then there's this evidence to show that these 12 weapons are real, whether it's causing a fake heart attack, well, not fake because it actually happens, but it's causing a heart attack. You know, is it really that implausible that they could be causing some sort of virulent strain of cancer and build your talks about the Charlie India alphas MK Ultra program? And alleges that Ruby's jailhouse doctor was Louis jolly. I'm using air quotes or jolly West, who was reported to be a top expert in MK Ultra. So is it really that outlandish? Is it really that crazy to believe that there was some kind of foul play here, something beyond what it appears to be? But see, that's a question that we're not supposed to ask. You know, I said, one of my goals for this podcast was to ask the stuff that we're not supposed to ask to ferret out information to look at the information that we're not supposed to know. You're not supposed to ask that. You're supposed to automatically assume that if somebody passes away due to a heart attack, a stroke, cancer, some all of a sudden they got a strain of cancer that was just uncontrollable, and within a matter of months, or maybe even weeks, they were dead. Don't question that shit happens. It's an act of God. But it's it's no foul play. I got interested in this topic. Yes, it's morbid, but as I said, I feel like people have a right to know if your tax dollars are being used to finance this kind of insane shit. You have a right to know you're paying for it. I bought Richard Belfield, but not Richard Meltzer. So we're talking about to Richard bells here. Richard Belfield has a book called terminate with prejudice, and expos a of the Pop Pop game. It's it's killers and their paymasters. And I, you know, I have mixed feelings about this book, if I were reviewing it and giving it like a rating on five stars, I probably give it a three, partly because it's not what I really expected when I bought it. And then also because I feel like he has some really clear biases here. I'm not always certain how accurate the information is. That's just my opinion. And it could be wrong. It seems to me that he really loves Princess Diana and is willing to believe almost any conspiracy theory as it relates to the death of Diana, which let's face it, that could and probably should be its own episode. What the hell really happened that night. I still remember watching Saturday Night Live and being sat in the living room watching it because for me, somebody my age is an excerpt of the 80s and 90s were kind of the glory time of SNL that I felt like it was funny back then. And I was watching SNL and all of a sudden NBC breaks in with a special report about how Diana had been in a car accident and she's in the hospital and, you know, we're awaiting word. And it was like, what, what the hell happened? And there was still this sense of hope that maybe she was going to be alright. But I remember telling my mom about it and she said, No, she's probably dead. I lived through the 60s I remember what all the pop pops were like back then people were getting killed left and right. And this is the time they're taking to get the family in. They're gonna get their story straight, but she's dead. And of course, sure enough, she was what it what a terrible thing. So it seems to me that Richard Belfield really loves Princess Diana really hates JFK, there's a lot of JFK hate in here. I quote Seymour Hersh his book and calls it a brilliant account. So I'm not going to belabor my point on that you're gonna know how I feel about the what I consider to be tabloid trash, worrying too much about somebody's sex life. As long as we're in the realm of consenting adults who all wanted the activity, it's not my freaking business. So the book goes over different pop pops. Julius Caesar, of course, mean we think of JFK as being the granddaddy of all conspiracy theories. And it is one hell of a wellspring. It's one of the reasons why he won't winds up being talked about so much on this broadcast is because it's just one thing after another. He also talks about Henry the second, and Thomas Beckett, he talks about these various attempts that the Soviets had at pop pops and none of them went well. People wound up defecting rather than actually going, going through with what they were hired to do. So it's not it's interesting. It's just not quite what I expected. When I bought the book. My my expectation was that he would get into more of the weapons like are, are these you know, heart attack causes and cancer cause causes? Are they real, but he doesn't get as far into that as I would have wanted. Now he does in the chapter, be careful when you choose your pop popper under the planning section, where he's discussing these various pop poppers from the Soviet Union who were hired to kill somebody, and then instead defected, they go up to the person that they're supposed to be murdering on behalf of the USSR and say, Hey, I was sent here to kill you. But I want to make a different choice and defect, can you get me to the west, you talks about the possibility that Stalin was actually killed using a massive overdose of warfarin, aka rat poison mean, you know, there's a blood center there. And if you take too much of it, it can certainly kill you. So there's one possibility of being just being poisoned by getting too much medication. There's another scenario he talks about where somebody has choreographed a car crash, somebody is supposed to be murdered in a car crash, but it goes wrong. So the person gets to the hospital, and is supposed to receive a lethal dose of poison injected into his veins. So he does get into a little bit here about medical pop pops. And he writes, according to the agency, if the pop popper is trained as a doctor or nurse, and the subject is under medical care, this is an easy and rare method, which is scary to think about. I mean, if somebody wants you dead, that badly, they could just do it as something medical, you have to go to the hospital, they can just make it look like you passed away of natural causes. or some shit happens. illness in the hospital. This is scary to think about. He talks about this weapon that the Soviets had developed where it's actually a Boomstick, but it's disguised as a packet of cigarettes. So on the outside, it appears to just be a packet of Chesterfield cigarettes, yet it actually has 232 caliber barrels inside it. Then they made another one that has for 25 caliber, b u, Ll. e, t SS inside it and how that was used along with poison so that in the event that the the Pop Pop didn't actually kill the person. The because the the b ul, I'm trying to think of a good euphemism there, the b u ll. E T's were dipped in poison, like anticoagulants, along with cyanide. So that the person if the if the pop up didn't get them, the poison and the anti coagulant wood. This is super scary. demented stuff. I mean, it's it's, it's gross that we even have to think about these intelligence organizations doing this, because in my mind, it's like you're taking the capacity of the human brain, which could be used for something great, and you're using it for something awful. For me, a more thorough account is given by Judith very Baker. In the documentary, the man who killed Kennedy in the episode titled the love affair. Now that the Docu series, the man who killed Kennedy really, that needs to be its own set of episodes. What I'd like to do at some point, is rewatch the series and do one episode of a podcast for each corresponding episode in the series because it is straight bonkers, y'all, if you have not seen it, holy cannolis. It's like more than seven hours long if you want to watch the Docu series in its entirety. So you're either going to binge watch it for a day or you're going to have to do it in installments. I did it for about a week and a half, two weeks when I would eat breakfast and eat Each morning I would be like, What in the hell kind of insanity am I going to consume today? Again, if we think about a five star scale, I would give it five out of five for entertainment, in terms of its accuracy, its veracity. That's where things get more nebulous, because it seems to me almost like a take all comers Docu series. If somebody said, Hey, I'm a witness, or, Hey, I'm a researcher, hey, I have something to say about this. They seem to be pretty open about who they allowed to participate in this documentary. So we have, you know, Richard Belfield, in this book, talking about these weapons that the Soviets developed, whether it's, you know, the potential that Stalin died from this massive overdose of warfarin, or boom sticks that have been disguised as cigarettes, and then also the contents they're in have been manipulated so that when they get in your body, there's an anticoagulant and a poison, and you're getting cyanide poisoning, so that if one thing doesn't get you the other one, will, they also talk about medical pop pops, get somebody in the hospital? If this fake ass car crash doesn't kill them, we'll don't worry about it, because we can nail them in the hospital.

 

This is scary. So in my mind, he he's telling us the Soviets did it, but it's like, Well, do you think that other governments haven't done the same thing? Do you think the Soviets exclusively had that knowledge? That seems very naive to me? All right, so enter stage left, if you will introduce Mary Baker. She really could be her own episode. Something else that I would like to do is to just take each one of these people that has some outrageous claim and just ask the question, what do we think about them? Does this person seem plausible? Does their story seem credible? Or does it seem like it's just made up for publicity and money? Like, what the hell's going on here? So I don't want to use my time and space in this episode to get into the love affair to get into it. Is this person telling the truth overall, I want to talk about her allegations about medical research and medical Pop Pop specifically, because it's really frightening is freaking terrifying. So back, I think in 2003, was when the program was recorded. She appears on the episode of the men who killed Kennedy in the love affair episode. And her claim is that she was involved with Lee Harvey Oswald, not only as platonic friends, but they were also lovers. And she's very blunt about that she doesn't skirt the issue, she's quite clear in saying they had a sexual liaison. We learn that she was some kind of science prodigy. And that when she was young, still in high school, in fact, she had been involved in cancer research. And according to her in in her story, on this episode of the love affair, she claims that she was able to give cancer to lab mice, which again, this is incredibly morbid, right? She was able to give cancer to laboratory mice faster than anyone else ever had. And so that naturally on Wink, wink, nudge nudge that naturally attracted the attention of the government, according to her, and it, put them it put it put her on the radar of being able to be used in a higher capacity. So she gets on their radar screen while she's still basically just a child to school child. After she graduates she moves to Buffalo and continues work on a cancer research project. And then her research continues through to like 1963 and she falls in with Alton, Ochsner. And it's like she's given this promise that if she will get involved with this research, that she'll be able to, like actually skip some years of college and just go straight into medical school at Tulane. So it's kind of like she It's like she's gone fathered. She's given this off offer that she can't refuse. They're making things so enticing that how can she say no, whatever her moral objections might be, to this research that they're wanting her to do. There's so much personal benefit to it, allegedly, that it's like, well, how can she really say no, so she's working with Dr. Ochsner and then also a Dr. Mary Sherman, who I believe was a physician at Oxford clinic. And Alright, so you have these various storylines going on here, allegedly, right, allegedly, that she's having this passionate sex affair with Lee Harvey Oswald, even though Judith herself is married, and Oswald is also married. In the episode The love affair she says that she probably would have married us Well, except that he admitted that he had hit Marina his wife, and she was so repulsed by that she told him that she did not support somebody being abusive to women and didn't want to marry him. But yet, you know, their love affair continues. Apparently her objection to his behavior didn't last that long because they do continue their affair. And she purports that she gets drawn into this plot with the cancer research. Now, other people have said that David Ferrie kept cancer mice in his apartment, which is super weird. Who does that? Like what normal civilian ordinary Joe keeps cancer mice in their apartment? For that matter what random person that's just working a nine to five job and punching a clock and living a normal life gets into cancer research as a side project anyway, that in and of itself, this whole cast of characters down there in New Orleans is super weird. And we see this also with Jim Garrison's investigation and his book on the trail. I mean, as you get to know more about this shady group of folk that were involved in the New Orleans side of the JFK pop up, it's like, What in the hell is even going on down there? When I watched Oliver Stone's movie for the first time, I remember thinking, who in the hill made Joe Pesci look this way? What is wrong with him? So then I found a real picture of David Ferrie, and I was like, holy shit. That was real. Oh my God. He has this like shoe polish black eyebrow job of painted on a horrible toupee. Just oh my god, it gets weirder and weirder. All right, so allegedly due to this pulled into to this weird conspiracy that's going on and involves David Ferrie and involves Oswald. And then it also involves at a higher level, allegedly, Ochsner, and Sherman. So she's supposed to be conducting this cancer research because drumroll, please. The idea behind it here with these anti Castro, anti communist folk, is that they are going to create a bio weapon with the intention of murdering Fidel Castro. And that Oswald supposedly is going to go to Mexico City, once they finally have their virulent strain of cancer made up and concocted, then Oswald is going to go to Mexico City and deliver this poison. And then there will be an agent who will get it into Cuba and make sure that Castro takes it. And the idea is that Castro will just through an apparent act of God wink, he will get sick with cancer. Nobody know and it won't be traceable to anybody. People will just say, Well, I mean, if he gets cancer, he gets cancer and shit happens. But it's nobody's fault. That's the that's the idea. And that because Judith is this cancer, Prodigy this wunderkind when it comes to cancer research, she's going to be involved in doing this. And she goes along with it again, she she does say that she like asserts her opinion that what they're doing is crazy and wrong. But she's threatened. It's like you can either skip part of your college and go directly into med school at Tulane and have a career. Or you can pop your mouth off and get yourself in a bunch of trouble. You know, you decide medical school at Tulane. Or maybe you're not being here anymore. So of course, she gets scared into doing it. She claims in the episode that they went to like an asylum, some such place like that. Maybe like a mental institution for the criminally insane a place like that. And they give this unwitting victim, the cancer that she's developed and the person dies, the person rapidly goes downhill and then dies. This is one of the things that she says that she has a moral objection to is the idea that they need to move it from lab rats into human trials. But of course, the people aren't going to know they're not giving any kind of informed consent to do this. They just take victims at this asylum and give them cancer. I mean, just let's just take a pause here. What the eff I mean, this is awful, if even a fraction of this is true. is awful. Is heinous. It's disgusting. It's crimes against humanity. It's Nuremberg trials level shit. I had this similar thought whenever I watched JFK for the first time the Oliver Stone film when it was finally over with because it's a long movie. I did watch it in two segments, but very worth my time. And when it was over with and I took a break I thought Shit man, if even a fraction of this is true, if most of it is bonkers bananas and it's off base, but only a sliver of it is true. It's still horrifying. even more so with the story that we're hearing from Judith Barry Baker, if only a scintilla of this story is true, it's heinous. You're going to make a virulent strain of cancer to be a bio weapon. Forget about the intended target. Who does that? What kind of evil has to be in somebody's mind in somebody's heart for them to think that's a good idea. That is, so supremely effed up, so supremely effed up.

 

So there's this cover job that Judith Baker gets, and then also Lee Harvey Oswald as well at this Riley Coffee Company. And this was an opportunity for them to continue to carry on their little love affair and have their trips, but also continue in their cancer research of coming up with this poisonous cocktail that they were going to give to Castro, there would be some first level round of it, that would help to knock out his immune system. And then subsequently, after that, this hyper virulent strain of cancer that they were trying to make would infect him and causes death. And again, it wouldn't be traceable to anybody, it would just appear to be an act of God. And maybe you got lung cancer from smoking, for example, that just shit happens and nobody could have controlled it. At some point, allegedly, this plot to murder Castro shifts into a plot to kill JFK instead. But they're not going to go through this elaborate process of infecting him with cancer, lowering his immune system and then infecting him with some terrible strain of cancer, violent strain of cancer. Which is intriguing because when we think about JFKs health anyway, you had a wide variety of health problems. He had war injuries. He had Addison's disease. I mean, I think he had colitis as well. He was he was ill quite a lot, not only in childhood, but then also getting into adulthood. So it's sort of amazing. If this is true, it's sort of amazing that they didn't figure out a way to give this to him, because it would have seemed plausible would have seemed way more plausible, if he had died of some natural cause because he was sick anyway, he had injuries and he was sick anyway. But they apparently allegedly supposedly, these anti Castro, anti communist people that were planning to do this to Castro decided to instead kill Kennedy. And they set up Oswald as their Patsy. Even though Oswald had been documented as as actually liking Kennedy, having gone to the library and checked out some of his books, even reading a book that that Kennedy said he read, like not that Oswald was necessarily interested in the book. It's just he wanted to read it. Because Kennedy liked it doesn't exactly you know, strike you as the kind of person that wants to go on a murder rage. But he becomes the Patsy. And according to Judith very Baker's side of the story, Oswald had figured out what was going on, and he wanted to try to go to Dallas to stop the plot. But instead of stopping the plot, he winds up being the Patsy. He was in Dealey Plaza. But he he didn't actually try to murder Kennedy. He was really just there to be the Patsy to be the fall guy. And of course, he figured out after he was arrested, he figured out what was going on. And that's why he shouted to the media. I'm just a patsy. Is this true? We don't know. We don't know. Honestly, I hope that if it's not it's a horrible thing. But you know, what if it is what if I mean, think about the plausibility here other people have said, not just Judith, very Baker, but other sources have said that David Ferrie had cancer mice in his apartment, which is weird. That in and of itself is weird. Allegedly, David Ferrie had said to some of his friends, that he was engaged in cancer research. But we don't know if that's true. I mean, when you're talking about hearsay, somebody said that he said, you know, can we get it as he said, she said they said whatever? I mean? Who knows? Who knows, I mean that the plot does sound far fetched. It sounds crazy. But just because it sounds crazy. And crackpot doesn't necessarily mean it's completely false. These people could have been working on something, which is not to say that they succeeded. It just could be that they were working on it. We do know if you think back to the episode that I recorded about Operation mongoose. We do know that there were some straight up Crazy pooped out plots that are known on the coffee or die magazine, they have this blog post about some of the insane ideas that were come up with. Whether it was LSD, perfume, drugs that were going to make Castro's famous beard Fallout, sea shells that would explode. I mean, there were some really crazy whacked out ideas. So does it seem that implausible, that you might have a group of people thinking that developing some terrible strain of cancer as a bio weapon and then giving it to Castro is it isn't really that implausible to believe? I mean, we're reading in terminate with extreme prejudice the Soviet weapons of Boomstick. That's disguised as a package of cigarettes. Oh, but then also, the BU ll ATS is our dipped in poison and anticoagulant hospital based pop pops medical based pop pops, is it really that implausible to believe that these things are real, and that they're being used? I mean, it's documented that the Soviets were doing it, is it really that unreasonable and crazy to think that, you know, other governments may have been doing the same thing? To me? It's not crazy or unreasonable? No, it isn't. And that's terrifying. Whenever you may think of due to Mary Baker and her story, some people think it's credible and that she, when they look at her evidence, files, the things that she actually has in her possession. They believe them to be true. Other people think she's just making it up for publicity or for money, or maybe she has a vivid imagination. Maybe she's crazy, and she thinks these things really did happen. I don't know. I truly don't know. For me, it's a horrifying story and and in my opinion, what she alleges about their cancer research and their development of a bio weapon that actually worked. That is 10 times more interesting than some salacious gossip about her and Lee Oswald and what they did in the bed together. I don't care. It's also really freaking terrifying. I mean, like, man, who are these people? What What are they doing? What kinds of backdoor behind the scenes things are going on? That we in the general public don't know about? Things that might be declassified years into the future? Yeah, we did it. Yeah, that was us. Yes, we have those weapons. But don't worry about it. Little peon. Go back on tick tock, go play on social media and don't worry about it. It's scary. So my conclusion is that yes, twip programs are real, as belts are mentioned in hitless, do the Church Committee talked about this, there were open testimonials. There's a video that you can watch, I'll drop a link to it, please check it out for yourself. And it's at the church committee. And it talks about the Charlie India Alpha having this secret heart attack weapon, where a dart could be fired. And it would just leave a tiny red.on someone's skin, the person might feel like they were bitten by a mosquito, the person might feel nothing, but it would cause this person to have a heart attack, and everything would dissolve and kill them within a matter of minutes. And then at the time of autopsy, it would just simply look like that person had a dead right their heart attack, and that was the end of it. So I personally believe that 12 programs are real. And there's reason to think that maybe when it comes to what Judith very Baker is saying about this cancer research. Maybe she's not so off base after all, whatever we may think about her alleged affair with Oswald and what all madness was going on down there in New Orleans. I think we do have to at least give credence to the possibility that these types of weapons exist. Stay a little crazy, and I'll see you in the next episode.

 

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